U.S. Foreign Policy in Peril: President Obama’s Worldview and the Democratic Ethos

A passer-by, right, departs a store that features cut-outs of President Barack Obama, left, and First Lady Michelle Obama, center, Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Oak Bluffs, Mass., on the island of Martha's Vineyard. President Obama and his family are returning to the island off the Massachusetts mainland Saturday. The president is doing something unusual with his summer vacation on Martha's Vineyard: He'll come back to Washington midway through the getaway to attend White House meetings. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

A passer-by, right, departs a store that features cut-outs of President Barack Obama, left, and First Lady Michelle Obama, center, Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014, in Oak Bluffs, Mass., on the island of Martha’s Vineyard. President Obama and his family are returning to the island off the Massachusetts mainland Saturday. The president is doing something unusual with his summer vacation on Martha’s Vineyard: He’ll come back to Washington midway through the getaway to attend White House meetings. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Journal of Political Risk, Vol. 2, No. 8, August 2014.

By Priscilla Tacujan, PhD

Critics from all sides of America’s political spectrum are either angry or exasperated over President Obama’s handling of foreign policy. Major U.S. newspapers, including those that endorsed his presidency, have recently published scathing editorials about how weak U.S. leadership has become. In the face of unfolding international crises, Western allies are forced to take a stance ahead of the President, sensing a lack of U.S. leadership and resolve that used to be the hallmark of American power in the world. U.S. leadership has come to mean mobilizing the coalition of nations, lending credence to the phrase “leading from behind.”

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