Nuclear Deal: Iran Wants At least 7,000 Centrifuges, Rejects Verification, and Likely Already Tested a Nuclear Weapon Device at Parchin

Journal of Political Risk, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 2014.

By Anders Corr, Ph.D.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry walks to his car with Austria's Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, right, as he arrives at Vienna International Airport, in Vienna, Austria, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Kerry meets Wednesday in Vienna with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif to try and advance nuclear talks and meet the target date of Nov. 24. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry walks to his car with Austria’s Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, right, as he arrives at Vienna International Airport, in Vienna, Austria, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014. Kerry meets Wednesday in Vienna with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif to try and advance nuclear talks and meet the target date of Nov. 24. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, Pool)

Iran wants at least 7,000 centrifuges for its uranium enrichment capacity, it made clear in negotiations with the United States and other members of the United Nations Security Council and Germany (the P5+1). Iran is currently spinning only 10,000 of its 20,000 centrifuges, and thus a drop to 7,000 centrifuges would not significantly slow its current rapid progress towards nuclear weapons capabilities. The current negotiations are hinging on a dispute between Iran, which wants at least 7,000 centrifuges, and the P5+1, which wants a limit of of 4,000 Iranian centrifuges.  Also impeding an agreement is that Iran is suspected to have already tested a nuclear weapon device, and has not agreed to an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) request for full monitoring and verification, including at its nuclear military site in Parchin.

The Journal of Political Risk received this information during an exclusive interview with a reliable official source on Wednesday October 23. JPR could not verify the official’s information, since the official requested anonymity. The official followed up with a detailed explanation, quoted below. Continue reading

Putin Extends Influence in Latin America

Journal of Political Risk, Vol. 2, No. 10, October 2014.

By Darya Vakulenko

Proton-M rocket blasts off from the Baikonur launch pad in Kazakhstan, Thursday, Dec. 25, 2008. Russia's space agency says three GLONASS-M satellites have been put into orbit by the Proton-M rocket. The satellites launched Thursday will join Russia's Global Navigation Satellite System, or GLONASS. (AP Photo)

Proton-M rocket blasts off from the Baikonur launch pad in Kazakhstan, Thursday, Dec. 25, 2008. Russia’s space agency says three GLONASS-M satellites have been put into orbit by the Proton-M rocket. The satellites launched Thursday will join Russia’s Global Navigation Satellite System, or GLONASS. (AP Photo)

Vladimir Putin’s most recent trip to Latin America is a sign of an ongoing Russian push to expand its influence and diversify foreign allies. In mid-July, the Russian president visited Cuba, Nicaragua, Argentina and ended his trip in Brazil, where the BRICS countries gathered for their 6th annual summit.

Throughout his tour, Putin discussed similar topics: assistance in developing and exploring new energy sources; installation of Global Satellite Navigation System (GLONASS), the Russian response to the U.S. Global Positioning System (G.P.S.); and agreements on boosting the presence of official Russian media in Latin America.

On energy, Putin and his team showed real determination to strengthen Russia’s position in the region. In Argentina, Rosatom, a Russian state-owned nuclear agency, submitted a proposal to construct the third unit for the Atucha nuclear plant. [1],[2]  In Cuba, Russian state-oil companies were the most active of the delegation. Zarubezhneft  presented plans to develop oil fields west of Boca de Jaruca, and Rosneft will search for offshore deepwater oil.[3] Additionally, the Russian energy holding company, Inter RAO, will build four energy blocks for Maximo Gomez, an electrical plant in East Havana.[4]

The push to install the navigation GLONASS system in each visited country was clear, as Russia is determined to become independent from the United States’s GPS network. For that reason, Putin and his government have resolved to place more control centers in the Western Hemisphere and thus improve the quality of the GLONASS constellation. Currently, apart from former Soviet states, only Brazil holds a GLONASS earth control station, on the campus of the University of Brasilia. There are plans to increase cooperation with the Brazilian Space Agency and place two more control centers in Pernambuco and Rio Grande do Sul. [5] Continue reading